Beginner Guide-Filters Tutorials

Last updated on February 16th, 2020 at 05:10 pm

Beginner Guide-Filters Tutorials

Beginner guide that demonstrates different types of filters you may encounter, and why you would want to use them

Uv filters Block or absorb ultraviolet (UV) light.
Skylight filters Designed to reduce the slightly blue cast
ND filters Neutral density filter
ND Graduated filter Is an optical filter that has a variable light transmission
Effect filters Star Filters, Fog filters, Centre Spot Filters, Day For Night Filters (DFN), Enhancing Filters,

In photography and videography, a filter is a camera accessory consisting of an optical filter that can be inserted into the optical path(lens).

The filter can be of a square or oblong shape and mounted in a holder accessory, or, more commonly, a glass or plastic disk in a metal or plastic ring frame, which can be screwed into the front of or clipped onto the camera lens.

https://en.wikipedia.org

Filters

This applies to owners of DSLR cameras.

Filters are accessories that can be inserted into the optical path to modify the photo, either a square shape and mounted in a holder, or more commonly, a circular piece of glass, which can be screwed into the front of the camera’s lens.

• Polariser. This is an expensive piece of glass but will darken blue skies, saturate colours, as well as reduce glare and nasty reflections in the water. A must-buy for landscapers!

• Serious landscapers carry a range of Neutral Density filters which slip into a dedicated filter holder.

These are used to tame a bright sky or to slow down moving water, and especially to get that stock-standard, blurry waterfall shot. Manufacturers include Cokin, Formatt and Lee.

• Graduated Neutral Density filters are similar to the NDs, but have a vignette from dark to light. The purpose here is to tame a bright sky and balance the exposure of a high-contrasting scene, in-camera. Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase. Thank you for your support! 


WHAT CAMERA LENS FILTERS ARE & HOW TO USE THEM

Beginner, intermediate, or advanced camera users can benefit from this course.


 

Beginner Guide-Filters Tutorials

This applies to owners of DSLR cameras.

Filters are accessories that can be inserted into the optical path to modify the photo… either a square shape and mounted in a holder, or more commonly, a circular piece of glass, which can be screwed into the front of the camera’s lens.

• Polariser. This is an expensive piece of glass but will darken blue skies, saturate colours, as well as reduce glare and nasty reflections in the water. A must-buy for landscapers!

• Serious landscapers carry a range of Neutral Density filters which slip into a dedicated filter holder.

These are used to tame a bright sky or to slow down moving water, and especially to get that stock-standard, blurry waterfall shot. Manufacturers include Cokin, Formatt and Lee.

• Graduated Neutral Density filters are similar to the NDs, but have a vignette from dark to light. The purpose here is to tame a bright sky and balance the exposure of a high-contrasting scene, in-camera.

Beginner Guide-Filters Tutorials

Ultra Violet (UV) Neutral Density (ND) & Polarizing (CPL)  Take a look at our video and learn how to improve your photography with lens filters.

By Digital Goja

Features:

-UV Filters reduce haze and improve contrast by minimizing the amount of ultraviolet (UV) light entering the lens.

-CPL Filters (Circular Polarizer) are great for removing unwanted reflections from non-metallic surfaces, such as glass or water.

-ND (Neutral Density) filters reduce the amount of light entering the film without affecting the colour. Perfect for higher-quality, long exposure pictures.

NOTE: Please verify your camera’s lens thread size before ordering. Your camera’s lens thread size will be marked somewhere on the lens barrel or printed underneath your lens cap. This number is always preceded by a “Ø” (diameter) symbol. For example: Ø58 = 58mm lens thread size.

 

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One Response

  1. Harland Sackos

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